Tennessee Walking Horses of Minnesota

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Cowboy Quotes, Sayings, and Wisdom
    
            
               

 

It was spring in the old west. The cowboys rode the still snow-choked trails looking for cattle that survived the winter. As one cowboy's horse went around the narrow trail, it came upon a rattlesnake warming itself in the spring sunshine.

The horse reared and the cowboy drew his six-gun to shoot the snake. "Hold on there, partner," said the snake, "don't shoot - I'm an enchanted rattlesnake, and if you don't shoot me, I'll give you any three wishes you want."

The cowboy decided to take a chance. He knew he was safely out of the snake's striking range. He said, "Okay, first, I'd like to have a face like Clark Gable, then, I'd like a build like Arnold Schwarzenegger, and finally, I'd like sexual equipment like this here horse I'm riding."

The rattlesnake said, "All right, when you get back to the bunk house you'll have all three wishes." The cowboy turned his horse around and galloped at full speed all the way to the bunk house. He dismounted on the run and went straight inside to the mirror.

Staring back at him in the mirror was the face of Clark Gable. He ripped the shirt off his back and revealed bulging, rippling muscles, just like Arnold Schwarzenegger. Really excited now, he tore down his jeans, looked at his crotch and shouted, "Oh my God, I was riding the mare!"

 

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

CAPRICORN 
(December 22 to January 19)
The Work Horse

Hard work is the name of the game for a Capricorn. Enjoys his job and puts his all into it every day. Proud, ambitious, and determined. Ideal for busy lesson programs. Opinionated. Knows his job and does not appreciate those who would try and tell him how to do it differently. Loves to win, and is competitive by nature at horse shows. Great to learn on. Not prone to misbehave, buck, or spook. Possesses an innate sense of dignity. A treasure for any trainer.

 

 

Why was the racehorse named Bad News?

Because

bad news travels fast!


 

 

 

 


"If Winter comes, can Spring be far behind?"

Funny Christmas jokes - Jesus Christ
A teacher in a school decided to check whether students know anything about religion and Jesus Christ. He asks the students:
- Do you know where Jesus Christ is today?
Tom says: in heaven
Mary adds: in my heart
Little Johnny stands up and shouts: I know where he is - in the bathroom.
Whole class goes silent. Teacher asks little Johnny in surprise: Why do you think so, Johnny?
- Every morning when my father wakes up, he shouts by the bathroom door: Jesus Christ, you're still there!!!
Read more at http://www.funny-jokes-quotes.com/funny-christmas-jokes.html#XOCYgdMUi6uzIJj1.99
Funny Christmas jokes - Jesus Christ
A teacher in a school decided to check whether students know anything about religion and Jesus Christ. He asks the students:
- Do you know where Jesus Christ is today?
Tom says: in heaven
Mary adds: in my heart
Little Johnny stands up and shouts: I know where he is - in the bathroom.
Whole class goes silent. Teacher asks little Johnny in surprise: Why do you think so, Johnny?
- Every morning when my father wakes up, he shouts by the bathroom door: Jesus Christ, you're still there!!!
Read more at http://www.funny-jokes-quotes.com/funny-christmas-jokes.html#XOCYgdMUi6uzIJj1.99
Funny Christmas jokes - Jesus Christ
A teacher in a school decided to check whether students know anything about religion and Jesus Christ. He asks the students:
- Do you know where Jesus Christ is today?
Tom says: in heaven
Mary adds: in my heart
Little Johnny stands up and shouts: I know where he is - in the bathroom.
Whole class goes silent. Teacher asks little Johnny in surprise: Why do you think so, Johnny?
- Every morning when my father wakes up, he shouts by the bathroom door: Jesus Christ, you're still there!!!
Read more at http://www.funny-jokes-quotes.com/funny-christmas-jokes.html#XOCYgdMUi6uzIJj1.99
Funny Christmas jokes - Jesus Christ
A teacher in a school decided to check whether students know anything about religion and Jesus Christ. He asks the students:
- Do you know where Jesus Christ is today?
Tom says: in heaven
Mary adds: in my heart
Little Johnny stands up and shouts: I know where he is - in the bathroom.
Whole class goes silent. Teacher asks little Johnny in surprise: Why do you think so, Johnny?
- Every morning when my father wakes up, he shouts by the bathroom door: Jesus Christ, you're still there!!!
Read more at http://www.funny-jokes-quotes.com/funny-christmas-jokes.html#XOCYgdMUi6uzIJj1.99
Funny Christmas jokes - Jesus Christ
A teacher in a school decided to check whether students know anything about religion and Jesus Christ. He asks the students:
- Do you know where Jesus Christ is today?
Tom says: in heaven
Mary adds: in my heart
Little Johnny stands up and shouts: I know where he is - in the bathroom.
Whole class goes silent. Teacher asks little Johnny in surprise: Why do you think so, Johnny?
- Every morning when my father wakes up, he shouts by the bathroom door: Jesus Christ, you're still there!!!
Read more at http://www.funny-jokes-quotes.com/funny-christmas-jokes.html#XOCYgdMUi6uzIJj1.99










 




 




 









 

      Question:  I recently purchased hay that feels a little moist but its not hot. After a week, if its not hot, will it still get hot or moldy?  How will I know that the hay is good?

      Response:  Hay typically goes through a curing process after harvest and the temperature inside the bale usually peaks between 11 and 14 days after baling.  Its common for hay to be warm to the touch during this time; however, hay should never feel hot.

      Most mold is directly related to moisture at the time of baling (poor storage condions can also lead to mold).

  Small square‐bales baled at less than 16% moisture will rarely mold, while hay baled at greater than 18% moisture will likely mold.  Hay baled between 16% and 18% moisture is a gray area and can either mold or be good quality. 

      To determine moisture, you should take a forage sample with a forage probe. You may be able to borrow a forage probe from a local feed store or Ag Coops  Many commercial feed companies that sell horse feed also offer hay testing services.  Core about 10% of the bales in your load and submit it to a commercial forage testing lab. 

Ensure the lab has a forage analysis for equine digesble energy so the resulted are useful to your horse (vs. a cow or other livestock). 

The resulting hay analysis will tell you the percent moisture of your hay.

      Alternatively, you can wait a minimum of 14 days and then open several bales.  If the opened bales appear to be good quality and have not molded, the hay should be suitable for your horses. If properly stored, the hay should remain good quality throughout the year.  If the bales are moldy or dusty, then return the load (if possible).   Moldy hay should never be fed to horses.   
 

 


 

 

Hay is the most expensive component in most horse diets. Buying good quality hay leads to financial savings and improved horse health. Here are some questions horse owners should ask when purchasing hay:

1. Have you sold to horse owners before or do you specialize in horse hay? Horse are more susceptible to mold and some weeds compared to other livestock. Horse hay suppliers tend to have experience in baling hay for horses.

2. What is the average weight of the bales? Very important if buying hay by the bale.

3. What crop/cutting is the hay? Helps indicate maturity and quality, but not critically important. To reduce the risk of weather‐related issues, horse owners should buy some hay from each cutting.

 

4. What species are present in the hay? Legume and grasses have different nutrient values. For example, a mature grass hay is best suited to adult horses at maintenance while legume hay is best suited for performance horses.

5. Where was the hay harvested? Rule out ditch hay. Ditch hay has a greater risk of being contaminated with weeds and garbage.

 

6. Was the hay rained on? Rained on hay is a good choice for horses with metabolic problems; it tends to be lower in water soluble carbohydrates. Hay that is rained on soon after cutting will have less losses in forage quality compared to raked hay.

7. Was the hay stored inside or under cover after baling? Hay stored inside or under cover has less storage loss. Storage and feeding losses can be as high as 50%.

8. Was the hay field fertilized and/ or sprayed for weeds or insects? Shows good management and likely be a better quality product.
Pesticides applied to hayfields are safe for livestock as long as labeled and harvest restrictions are followed.

 

9. What are the payment options? Most hay producers require payment at the me of delivery.

10. Is delivery available and what is the cost? Finding a local hay supplier will save on trucking.

11. What is the price of the hay? Is there a reduction for volume or cash?

 

12. Is assistance available with onsite handling and stacking of hay, and if so, at what cost?

13. Is storage an option? If so, what is the cost? Most horse owners do not have enough onsite, inside hay storage.

 

14. How much hay do you have/bale each year? Helps ensure a consistent supply of hay.

Changing of any feed, including hay, should occur gradually and over several weeks to reduce the risk of colic and digestive upset.

Questions to Ask When Purchasing Hay By: Krishona Marnson, PhD, Univ. of Minn.

 




 

 

 

Research Update:  Cecal Impactions



Cecal impacon (a type of colic) can have life threatening complications if not diagnosed and treated promptly. Researchers in Pennsylvania set out to evaluate short and long term outcomes, after medical and surgical management, of these horses with cecal impacon, to determine reasons for death or euthanasia.

Data collected from medical records (1991-2011) of horses with a diagnosis of cecal impacon was conducted and included medical signs, history of recent disease and surgical procedures, admission data, management,

Complicaons, and final outcome. Short term outcomes (alive or dead at discharge) and long term outcomes (alive or dead at ≥1 year) were determined by telephone interview.

Of 150 horses hospitalized with a diagnosis of cecal impacon, 102 (68%) had a history of recent disease or a surgical procedure. Thirty eight horses (25%) had cecal perforaon at admission and 3 horses (2%) were euthanized
without treatment.


Of 109 horses treated, 59 (54%) were managed medically and 50 (46%) surgically. The proportion of horses alive at hospital discharge was significantly lower for horses managed medically (61%) compared with surgically (82%). Fifty seven percent of horses managed medically were alive at 1 year.

The proportion of horses alive at hospital discharge was lower for both medically and surgically managed horses with cecal impacon compared to past reports. There was decreased survival for horses treated medically than those treated surgically.

Researchers recommend treating cecal impacons surgically rather than medically. However, 61% of horses managed medically survived. Horse owners should be aware of outcomes when selected a management method for horses with cecal impactions.

For more informaon on this study contact,

Krishona Marnson,

PhD, University of Minnesota

 


 

 

Options for Disposal of Equine Carcasses

      Proper disposal of animal carcasses is an important part of preventing the potential spread of disease and protecting air and water quality. Unless slaughtered for human consumpon, animals that die need to be disposed of within 72 hours.      

      Minnesota horse owners have options for disposal of a carcass. The State of Minnesota regulates these options and involves the Departments of Agriculture, Natural Resources, Pollution Control Agency (MPCA), and Board of Animal Health (MBAH).

 

      The legal options for disposing of horse carcasses in Minnesota include:
 burial, composting, incineration, and rendering. 

Carcasses must be buried 5 feet above the season‐high water table and not in soils that are within 10 feet of bedrock. When composting, the carcass must be completely covered by a carbon source (i.e. sawdust) and monitored for temperature, oxygen level and moisture.  With incineration, carcasses must be incinerated in a MPCA approved incinerator. Vehicles that haul carcasses for rendering services need to be inspected and permitted by the MBAH.

      For more informaon on carcass disposal in MN, visit the MBAH website.  

 















 

 















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